Welcome to the Orioles Nation Forums! Like most online communities, you must register to post on our message board. However, posting is free--it always will be--and registration is a simple process. Become part of the growing Orioles Nation community and register now!

Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #1 by ofahn » October 7th, 2011, 8:02 pm

Dan Connolly of the Baltimore Sun is reporting that Andy MacPhail will leave his position as the Orioles' president of baseball operations because of family obligations. A source tells Connolly the move is "imminent."
User avatar
ofahn
Aberdeen IronBirds
 
Posts: 4376
Joined: May 2011
Reputation Score: 85

Re: Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #2 by Jordan Tuwiner » October 7th, 2011, 8:25 pm

Thanks for posting this. I'll be live blogging here, use this thread to discuss!

http://orioles-nation.com/2011/10/07/an ... rioles-gm/
User avatar
Jordan Tuwiner
Aberdeen IronBirds
 
Posts: 2588
Joined: September 2010
Location: Israel
Reputation Score: 57



Re: Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #3 by ofahn » October 7th, 2011, 8:58 pm

I posted earlier that I was hoping our next GM would take the following approach in rebuilding this team
http://orioles-nation.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=491.

BUILD THE TEAM AROUND PITCHING AND DEFENSE – This has been the blueprint for almost every winning team the Orioles have ever had. Good defense makes good pitching even better and gives a pitcher the knowledge that, if the batter puts the ball in play, the defense will turn it into an out.

Good pitching is more than just command and control. It’s the ability to do little things like:

• holding runners on base
• keeping the fielders in the game by pitching quickly
• fielding the position
• knowing when to pitch to contact and when to go for the strikeout

Sure, it’s easy to SAY get good players, but where do they come from? Player development, good scouting, and good trades. Teams aren’t going to give us their better young players because we’re so pathetic. We’re going to have to find undeveloped talent and pay what’s necessary to bring them to Baltimore while we wait another two or three years for our farm system to fill the rest of the holes.

In the mean time we should be focusing on players with the best fundamentals in order to build a tradition of playing the game the right way.

SIGN THE BEST PLAYERS FROM THIS YEAR’S DRAFT AND INCREASE THE DRAFT BUDGET IN THE FUTURE – Dylan Bundy, Jason Esposito, and Nick Delmonico are the class of this year’s draft picks and MUST be signed. My guess is that it will take about 10M for these players alone and that’s probably about 1M more than Andy MacPhail has budgeted.

The Orioles just saved at least 1M in the deadline trades and should use this to make sure all three players are signed. Winning teams have consistently productive farm systems and ours is anything but that.

The teams we are trying to overcome (Yankees, Red Sox, and Blue Jays) spend between 15 and 20M on amateur talent each year. We don’t and it’s the reason we have been forced to trade for or sign expensive players. Delmonico might cost 1.5M to sign but if he turns out to be the next David Wright then he will be a bargain. Even if it takes four prospects like him, all costing the same amount, to get a player like Wright it’s STILL a bargain.

INVEST IN THE MINOR LEAGUES – No player should reach the major leagues for the Baltimore Orioles without a solid education in baseball fundamentals. We can assure that will not happen IF we provide consistent and extensive coaching in the minors. In effect, let’s re establish the ORIOLE’S WAY.

That means that every player progressing through the Orioles’ farm system learns how to advance runners without a hit, go from first to third, bunt, hit the cut off man, and communicate with their teammates on the field THE SAME WAY. If a player can do those things he doesn’t have to be a star to be part of a winning team.

Improve Conditioning and Nutrition. I’m tired of watching a team full of players that aren’t physically prepared to perform at their best level for an entire season.

Transitioning from high school to professional baseball is a difficult process. In addition to learning the game you thought you knew at a level and speed beyond your expectations, an eighteen year kid has to learn how to live on his own and be responsible for himself. Half of this young player's day is unstructured. Bad habits can develop in their conditioning and behavior.

Minor league players are normally awake sixteen hours a day. Only six to seven of those hours are at the ball park. Why? The whole purpose of the minors is to learn HOW to play the game and develop your skills. Why not require the players to spend at least two more hours at the park with their coaches to work on the areas that need improvement? Of course, adding a coach or two to each level would allow for more one on one time with a player that needs it.

Assign a year round strength and conditioning coach to monitor the player's off season conditioning. No player should show up at spring training out of shape. If at least one member of the development staff had the responsibility to monitor the players’ off season conditioning routines the chances of that happening are a LOT less.

Another way to improve a prospect’s conditioning is to expand their participation with the club until the end of October. Winning MLB teams don’t stop playing until Halloween but the minor leagues end their season about mid September. Why not pay our top thirty or so prospects to work out at the Sarasota facility until at least mid October? Not only is it extra coaching but there’s plenty of time to shed unwanted weight and improve core body strength.

We also need to add a year round nutritionist and spend the money to provide our prospect more nutritious food. Minor league club houses provide their players with junk food because it’s cheap. It’s also full of calories and fat while offering little in nutrition. Switching from fried chicken to broasted, hamburgers to ham and cheese, regular chips to baked chips, providing fresh fruit, etc would cost about 100K a year. Would anyone pay that to see Matt Hobgood thirty pounds lighter? TELLING these young and impressionable players to eat better and then providing them CRAP for food is NOT proper guidance.

The second part of the nutrition program should be increasing the players’ meal money to about $40 a day with the requirement that they keep a daily log of what they eat and the requirement they provide their nutritionist with their restaurant receipts showing what they have eaten if they start to have a weight problem. This might cost another 150K or so a year but it would turn out better prospects. Considering the cost of just ONE MLB veteran, it’s a bargain.

Build a Nurturing Environment. Minor league clubs have traditionally had no more than four coaches for 23 or 24 players and these coaches may be new or inexperienced to the teaching process.

I'd like to see the team add to the quantity and quality of our player development staff. Furthermore, I would like to see the team build a permanent minor league coaching staff of instructors that are being paid at two or three times the normal rate for a minor league coach but committed by contract for five to ten years at the same level. This would mean that coaches that do the best job with the youngest players would be at rookie or short season level year after year and coaches that do the best work with players that are almost ready for the majors would be at the upper levels.

Some coaches in baseball start at the bottom in a system and work hard to reach the majors but often this is because of the pay and benefits. Let’s allow the those pros that like to develop players do that by taking away the money issue and give them a good living with a solid pension. All of the Orioles’ farm teams are in areas that provide a good quality of life; and Bowie, Frederick, and Aberdeen are close enough that the coach or manger could live in the Baltimore metro area.

What I'm suggesting would cost the team about a million dollars extra a year which is insignificant compared to the eight or nine million they CURRENTLY spend on amateur talent and even a smaller percentage of the 15M or so they SHOULD be spending. If we were to develop just one more player each year through the system, that rookie's 400K salary would be a lot cheaper than the average 5M it takes to sign a MLB veteran.

Pay the Minor League Free Agents Top Dollar. Baltimore has a reputation for being cheap when it comes to paying minor league free agents and veterans. Why? These are the players we hope will fill a hole or two in spring training, be ready to come up from AAA if a player is injured, or mentor the prospects in the system. We seem to miss out on the best of these players to the teams that will give them 10K a month instead of 7K. Teams like San Diego and Tampa always seem to come up with a solid reliever or role player every spring because they understand that a little more money to the right guy might be a really good investment. Good scouting would make that extra money a good investment.

EXPAND DOMESTIC SCOUTING – The most efficient and effective way to obtain talent is through good scouting. The Orioles are in the bottom third of teams in the number of scouts and that’s inexcusable for a team that can’t afford to out bid others for MLB players.

A perfect example is Glynn Davis who was signed as an undrafted free agent. The fact that he played ball in the Baltimore area probably had a lot to do with how the team knew his potential. Just imagine if the team doubled their scouting staff and found a Davis EVERY YEAR in other parts of the country.

Additional scouting would allow us to scout more of the minor leagues and find talent to trade for or select in the Rule 5 draft.

This would cost about 1M a year but, AGAIN, is a bargain if it produces just one more MLB player a year.

EXPAND INTERNATIONAL SCOUTING – This is an area that the team is horribly understaffed. More and more impact players are coming from this market and the Orioles are in the bottom third of team spending. You aren’t going to beat the Yankees or Red Sox at the MLB level if they’re outspending you for major league players, draft picks, AND international talent.

This would cost about 500K a year but, AGAIN, is a bargain if it produces just one more MLB player every other year.

HIRE A TALENT EVALUATOR – Over the last fifteen years the team has been inconsistent in developing talent. Is that because they don’t have talented prospects or that we can’t develop the talent we have?

What we need is to hire a talent evaluator to review what’s in the system and which prospects SHOULD become solid MLB players. That gives us a better idea of which positions should be a priority for future drafts and trades.

This person might be a GM that lacked some of the ingredients to be successful at that level but knows talent when they see it. Kevin Towers was just that kind of executive. He built one solid bullpen after another in San Diego from scraps and castoffs. After he was fired by the Padres he was signed by…wait for it…the YANKEES for the 2010 season and then was hired by the Diamondbacks as their GM.

Find the right person and give them a five year contract for 250K a year or so. See how quickly that investment pays off.

I'm less concerned about who takes that job than I am about the way they go about running the team.
User avatar
ofahn
Aberdeen IronBirds
 
Posts: 4376
Joined: May 2011
Reputation Score: 85

Re: Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #4 by Rising O's » October 9th, 2011, 8:48 am

And no advisory roll? Eggcellent. We don't need a tortoise to get in the way of a GM who is ready to wheel and deal. Now I just have to pray Angelos finds a knowledgeable baseball person he can trust to choose his next GM.
Rising O's
GCL Orioles
 
Posts: 984
Joined: April 2011
Reputation Score: 10

Re: Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #5 by ofahn » October 9th, 2011, 9:31 am

Rising O's wrote:I just have to pray Angelos finds a knowledgeable baseball person he can trust to choose his next GM


and that will be honest with Angelos about how broken the farm system is and what it REALLY cost to fix it.
User avatar
ofahn
Aberdeen IronBirds
 
Posts: 4376
Joined: May 2011
Reputation Score: 85

Re: Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #6 by Jordan Tuwiner » October 9th, 2011, 11:53 pm

I'm pulling for Tony LaCava or John Coppolella.

MacPhail needed to go but I think it's obvious new personnel in the minors should take priority over a new GM.
User avatar
Jordan Tuwiner
Aberdeen IronBirds
 
Posts: 2588
Joined: September 2010
Location: Israel
Reputation Score: 57



Re: Andy MacPhail Is Stepping Down From His GM Post

PostPost #7 by ofahn » October 10th, 2011, 8:31 am

Jordan wrote:I think it's obvious new personnel in the minors should take priority over a new GM.


From your lips to Angelos's ears.
User avatar
ofahn
Aberdeen IronBirds
 
Posts: 4376
Joined: May 2011
Reputation Score: 85



Return to Baltimore Orioles

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

cron